Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Advanced Breads
 2. Refrigerator Mother
 Can I use an existing starter?
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Author Topic  

MaryJane
145 Posts
MaryJane
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Mar 22 2018 :  08:35:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Becca asked this question on another thread. I decided to include it here also under our Refrigerator Mother category because it's probably a question that will come up again.

QUESTION (Becca): Is it possible to use my current refrigerator mother that I started months ago with your recipes? I should be able to get it to the point of feeding it on the same schedule and manner that you have (it currently sits until I need it, then I feed it at night, leave it on the fridge and then use it in a levain (you call it activated batter) the next morning. It makes WONDERFUL bread, but it is mostly made with organic white bread flour (unbleached of course). My other question is can I use a Kamut mother and add sprouted whole wheat flour to it? I would like to experiment with various grains, but I don't have the space to keep multiple flour variation mothers around. By the way, I mill my own flour (any grain) when baking / cooking with the exception of the bread flour, but I am working on that!!

ANSWER (MaryJane): Because a mother or starter becomes YOU over time (your kitchen and environment), it seems like you could convert it easy enough. And yes, I think a combo mother would work fine. In fact, Iíve been wanting to try that myself. With Kamut flourís wonderful texture and sprouted flourís benefits and flavor, why not?! I hope youíll share the results. How wonderful that you mill your own flour. When it comes to wild bread, I know I have a life time ahead of me of fun experimentations.
Ashley and I are going to attempt cinnamon rolls again today. Hereís how our refrigerator mother looked at 7 this morning right after Iíd stirred more flour and water in (she was also added to last night). Immediately, I started seeing bubbles rise to the surface.



MaryJane Butters, author of Wild Bread ~ for we were all one family then ~

Ashley
425 Posts
Ashley
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Mar 22 2018 :  09:58:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I agree with MaryJane. I don't see any reason that you couldn't convert your existing mother to the same feeding schedule/amounts as the recipe in the book. It won't take long for it to be that same consistency as the mother in the book, and since it is already active and making wonderful breads, it would be a shame to start over.

Also, I think it would be wonderful to experiment with a blended-flour mother. All of the mothers have the same feeding schedule and amounts, so why not? Playing with food is most of the fun of cooking.

Ashley Ogle
Go to Top of Page

Sylvia Jacobus
57 Posts
Sylvia
Kent WA
USA

Posted - Mar 22 2018 :  10:33:24 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was given a "San Francisco" starter bu a fellow quilter friend. It's been in her family for over 100 years. I now use it interchangeably with my mother. Until I made a kamut mother, I've been using these two mothers with einkorn, kamut and rye flours I grind. I'm not sure this "playing" should be encouraged but I have been enjoying the recipes in this book.

Bread is like the sun. It rises in the yeast and sets in the waist. Unknown author
Go to Top of Page

becca
7 Posts


Posted - Mar 23 2018 :  2:01:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you so much for the feedback. In my opinion, what Wild Bread calls a "mother" is what I would call my "starter. I'm not sure if that is right or not!! So, my "starter" is much thicker than your mother, so I will work on getting in thinned out and then start making some recipes with some fresh ground flour. I will follow up and let you know!

BBB (Bread Baking Becca)
Go to Top of Page

MaryJane
145 Posts
MaryJane
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Mar 24 2018 :  10:53:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking forward to an update on how your mother is coming along.

MaryJane Butters, author of Wild Bread ~ for we were all one family then ~
Go to Top of Page

becca
7 Posts


Posted - Mar 24 2018 :  1:44:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, I currently have dough (Kamut) rising. However, my "bake day" unexpectedly changed dramatically, so I am changing the process to fit that. This is what I would consider to be a benefit of having been making traditional sourdough bread for quite awhile already. Your process is faster and easier. I may end up combining the two! One of my favorites of yours is that it only makes one loaf at a time. Although, usually, when I make two loaves with my other recipes, I give one away!! My only wish - was that weights would have been included as well. I will figure out weights as I go and be making lots of notes in my book!! Once I am done baking, I will definitely let everyone know. Is there a way we can post photos? I don't see anything right off. Thanks!

BBB (Bread Baking Becca)
Go to Top of Page

MaryJane
145 Posts
MaryJane
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Mar 24 2018 :  2:13:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, to photos! We love them.

After you've hit "Reply to Topic" you'll see a yellow photo icon just one in from the right. Click and post.

Here are more detailed instructions:
http://www.wildbread.net/faq.asp#images

MaryJane Butters, author of Wild Bread ~ for we were all one family then ~
Go to Top of Page

becca
7 Posts


Posted - Mar 25 2018 :  4:25:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Got the bread made today. Photos to follow. I ended up mixing dough in a mixer with a 30 minute rest after a quick mix to a shaggy dough to allow time for my fresh ground Kamut to absorb the whey (strained from making homemade Greek yogurt). Then, I did a looooooong rest on the counter (about 4 hours) and then shaped it and placed it in my banetton and into the fridge overnight. Took it out after about 18 hours and allowed my cloche to preheat in the oven. The dough looked beautiful.....until I went to remove it from the banetton, and it stuck just a bit, causing it to deflate some. I quickly got it into the oven and got just a tiny bit of oven spring. If it hadnít stuck.......oh well, tastes yummy and canít wait to try again!!

BBB (Bread Baking Becca)
Go to Top of Page

becca
7 Posts


Posted - Mar 25 2018 :  4:29:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote



BBB (Bread Baking Becca)
Go to Top of Page

MaryJane
145 Posts
MaryJane
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Mar 25 2018 :  5:32:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Did it taste as good as it looks? Gorgeous! Those banneton baskets eventually season but it takes a few tries.

Speaking of something taking a few tries, when you click on the icon to load a photo, make sure you leave your cursor in the exact spot in your post where you want the photo to land. I always leave it on the second line down from text so there's some space between it and text both above and below. Then two more line spaces and a second photo if you have one (or more text).

To keep photos from showing sideways: After you've finished with the "Browse" function (you can see text in the space next to the word "Browse"), and you click on "Upload," you'll see two arrows at the top you can use to rotate your photo (your selected photo will be visible), then click "I'm done."


MaryJane Butters, author of Wild Bread ~ for we were all one family then ~
Go to Top of Page

PaneCreatore
60 Posts
Janet
Iowa
USA

Posted - Mar 26 2018 :  04:47:53 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow Becca! What a gorgeous loaf of bread! I've never baked in a banneton basket. Another adventure for another time. Thanks for sharing your experience and photo.

"Good bread is the most fundamentally satisfying of all foods; and good bread with fresh butter, the greatest of feasts." -James Beard
Go to Top of Page

Sylvia Jacobus
57 Posts
Sylvia
Kent WA
USA

Posted - Mar 26 2018 :  08:38:20 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Becca,
Beautiful loaf. Thanks for the photos.

Bread is like the sun. It rises in the yeast and sets in the waist. Unknown author
Go to Top of Page

Ashley
425 Posts
Ashley
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Mar 26 2018 :  09:30:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Your bread looks wonderful Becca! The banneton can be a little tricky at first, but after a few uses it does get a nice coating of flour that keeps dough from sticking. A light sprinkling of either cornstarch or tapioca starch can also help, but just a little or it will transfer to your bread. I love the spiral pattern left on breads proofed in a banneton basket. :)

Ashley Ogle
Go to Top of Page
  Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To: