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Needle
2 Posts
Judy
Kissimmee FL
USA

Posted - Mar 20 2018 :  3:49:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm getting my kitchen ready to start my mother. Should I through out any yeast I have in the fridge? Also, where is a good place to store my store bought bread and buns while mother is growing? Don't want to upset her!! I don't want to keep moving her every time I pack lunches or fix dinner.

YellowRose
75 Posts
Sara
Paris TX
USA

Posted - Mar 20 2018 :  3:56:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Judy, I'm just starting out too so I will be watching for the answers to your questions so I will know what to do in my kitchen.

Edited to add: I ferment in my kitchen will it affect my Mother?

Lord put your arms around my shoulders and your hand over my mouth.

Edited by - YellowRose on Mar 21 2018 08:55:04 AM
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Ashley
653 Posts
Ashley
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Mar 21 2018 :  11:20:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is a good question. As long as the yeast in your refrigerator is in a sealed container, it shouldn't be a cause for concern until your mother is mature enough to be converted to a refrigerator mother and take up a permanent residence in your refrigerator.

Also, when it comes to store-bought breads and your counter mother sharing the same airspace, I'd just make sure that the breads are stored elsewhere, and when they are out, I'd do my best to keep some distance between store-bought breads and counter mother. Hopefully soon you will be enjoying breads baked with your counter mother, and won't need to juggle store-bought breads and your counter mother.

As for the effect fermenting other foods in your kitchen along with your counter mother goes, I'd just pay attention to the smell and look of both. Your mother should be bubbly, smell pleasantly sour, and free of molds, and any other "off" looking growths. If your fermented foods start turning out differently, then it might not be the best set-up. On the other hand, this could be a great symbiotic scenario in which both enrich the surrounding air. You don't know until you try!


Ashley Ogle
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MaryJane
162 Posts
MaryJane
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Mar 21 2018 :  4:57:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
As much as I’d like to, it’s hard to answer your question in black-and-white terms because every kitchen is so different, just like gardens are when it comes to cross-pollination. Sometimes it’s a simple matter of which way the wind was blowing at the exact moment a bloom happened and whether or not a honeybee also stopped by to visit. For those of us who are gardeners, we’ve learned to experiment when we endeavor to save seed for the following year (and prepare ourselves for disappointment sometimes, like the year I had butternut squash that was a weird color—some of them were even striped like a zucchini).

Like I said in Wild Bread on page 23, “During the time you have your mother living on your counter and you decide to make a batch of bread using store-bought yeast or you bring store-bought yeasted breads into your home, your mother will get out of sorts. In fact, she may never get over your transgression. If you bring breads made with commercial yeast into your home, you can cover your mother in her glass container and keep her in your refrigerator until the coast is clear.”

I can share with you some of the “cross-pollination” yeast problems we’ve had in our kitchen, which is why we’ve learned to err on the side of caution and prevention.

When Ashley and I were working on our Milk Cow Kitchen book and developing cheese recipes, we had a couple of our cheese wheels explode in a strange way. They were full of bubbles and busted out of their wax exterior within a few days (normally they age up to 2 years once they’re waxed). It was like an alien had invaded them. After it happened the second time, we realized it was because Ashley was working on a bread recipe using store-bought yeast for our magazine and had the bread rising on the same counter as we had put a wheel of cheese into a cheese press (a 2-day affair before it’s waxed).

We were finishing-up our new commercial kitchen, so we moved cheese pressing into a side room through a door next to our new kitchen. Once we moved into our new kitchen, we decided to designate it our wild-bread-making kitchen, and any store-bought-yeast bread making/recipe testing would be done in Ashley’s home kitchen. Up until then, I’d kept a mother in my personal kitchen. Since then, we’ve also kept our cheese pressing in the other room. We’ve never had any problems, but obviously we haven’t tested just how much separation we need (and I know of another cheese maker who had the exact same store-bought-yeast-tainted-cheese problem).

Long story short, we don’t have a ready answer, but it’s definitely something we’d like to gather feedback on so that eventually we could provide a more definitive answer. Many hands make bright ideas work better!

So, in answer to your question, Judy, “I don't want to keep moving her every time I pack lunches or fix dinner,” if it were me, I would keep my store-bought breads sealed up somehow. Airtight bread box? Or maybe just the plastic bags they come in, and then when I needed to have the bread out on my counter, I’d pop the lid that comes with the Glasslock on my mother until the coast is clear. Technically, the yeast in baked bread have been killed in the oven, but there are other critters afoot in and on commercially-yeasted breads because they mold quicker, etc. It’s just a different creature.


MaryJane Butters, author of Wild Bread ~ for we were all one family then ~
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Susan
2 Posts
Susan
Middletown IN
USA

Posted - Oct 10 2022 :  04:42:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hello, just starting. Can I use a raisenne dough riser on bake day? Also, can I store my mother during the week in appliance garage with door shut? Thanks
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Ashley
653 Posts
Ashley
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Oct 10 2022 :  10:08:20 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Susan, I had never heard of a raisenne dough riser, so I had to look it up, and I think it would work great on bake day since its intended use is for proofing breads.

Regarding your appliance garage, how sealed up is it? Your mother will need some amount of air flowing around it to help it ferment and pull in wild yeasts from the air.

Ashley Ogle
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