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 3. Advanced French Breads
 Advanced Dutch Oven Boule
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505Queen
3 Posts
Renee
Albuquerque NM
USA

Posted - Sep 26 2021 :  1:27:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Everyone! I've been using MaryJane's Wild Bread cookbook for nearly a year now. I've made some pretty darn good parker rolls, pullman loaves, and English muffins. I am, however, still having trouble getting my boule to rise! I followed the cookbook recipe and it was okay but didn't really rise. I know I'm having an issue with wet sticky dough.

So, the last time I made it (today), I decided to bake it in a dutch oven. I put my dough on the counter overnight. It had a really good rise the next morning. Based on cobbling a few recipes from various sources together, I decided to turn the dough out to knead 10-15 times but couldn't because it was so wet and sticky. I added some flour and then kneaded, which was easier. I put the dough in a banneton to rise for 3 hours.

Then I heated the oven to 425 with the dutch oven inside. Once up to temperature, I put the dough (after I cut the top with a lame) into the hot dutch oven and baked with the lid for 25 minutes. I checked the temperate, about 200 degrees, and then took the lid off for another 15 minutes to get some browning on top.

It turned out okay but no rise to speak of really. Can anyone please tell me where I am going wrong?! As I said, the overnight 1st rise seemed great. But the texture was definitely too sticky and wet. Should I have done something different there? Should I have kneaded longer? Should I have done the 30 minute turn and fold, rest, 4 times?

Thank you in advance for reading this and for sharing your expertise.

Renee Fox

505Queen
3 Posts
Renee
Albuquerque NM
USA

Posted - Sep 26 2021 :  1:48:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Also, I may have just let it over-ferment on the first rise. It ended up rising for 18 hours (3:30 pm-9:30 am). Would that cause sticky wet dough? And, if yes, would there be a way I can fix it so I can knead the dough and it will rise? Thanks!

Renee Fox
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Ashley
617 Posts
Ashley
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Sep 27 2021 :  10:08:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi! To start, I have a couple of questions. Which type of flour are you using, and when you mix your dough, are you adding the upper limit of flour called for in the recipe?

During your last attempt, I suspect that the overnight rise contributed to the wet consistency of your bread. As it sat overnight, the yeasts and bacteria likely worked to break down the gluten proteins in the flour, resulting in a loose dough. It's comparable to when you first get your mother started—the flour/water mixture is thick and sticky, but after the first few days, once some yeasts and bacteria get their feet in the door, the consistency of your mother relaxes.

The best process for making the boule is to turn it as described in step 4 using bowl scraper. It sounds like you had difficulty with this initially, because your loaves were turning out formless. I think adding more flour would remedy this issue. You want the dough to be a little wet, because during the first 2 hour proof, the flour in the dough will absorb excess water. This is especially true for Kamut and sprouted wheat. However, your dough shouldn't be so wet that you can't work it with lightly oiled hands. Knowing which type of flour you're using is helpful for troubleshooting, because each one behaves differently (we touch on some of these quirks in the section titled "Let's Talk Flour and Specialty Ingredients", which begins on p. 190).

Ashley Ogle
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