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Patricia Severson
4 Posts
Patricia
Grand Junction CO
USA

Posted - Dec 30 2019 :  10:08:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi, I'm Pat. I am in week four. The first two weeks I made waffles. On Saturday, I made my first bread. I am using brown rice flour as I am gluten sensitive. The bread came out very "sour" and dense. I liked the flavor but I wish it had risen more. I think I should have cooked it longer. I have ordered a proofer and am hoping that will help.

Ashley
452 Posts
Ashley
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Dec 30 2019 :  12:45:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Pat, and welcome to the chatroom. I'm sorry to hear your first batch of bread didn't rise enough. By nature, the rice breads are going to be a little more dense that those made with wheat flours. If the temperature in your kitchen fluctuates, the proofer might be just what's needed to keep your mother at an ideal temperature, which in turn could help with the rise as well as the strong sour flavor. As for baking your bread longer, was it doughy in the middle?

I'm looking forward to hearing about how your future Bake Days go.

Ashley Ogle
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Patricia Severson
4 Posts
Patricia
Grand Junction CO
USA

Posted - Dec 31 2019 :  11:33:26 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, it was a little doughy. I did use a thermometer and it did reach 200 degrees, but next time I will leave it to 205. Also, the bread falls apart very easily. It is impossible to put a slice in the toaster. Should I add xanthan gum to the dough mix?
Thanks for your reply.
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Ashley
452 Posts
Ashley
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Dec 31 2019 :  1:09:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The rice breads do have tendency to be a little chewy or spongy, but it should be firm and hold together. Cooking to 205 degrees next time should help. To make your bread hold together better, on p. 38, the recipe for Beginner Batter Bread calls for adding eggs, this one might be better for you, as the eggs will bind it. We omitted the use of xanthan gum in the book, and instead rely on binder such as eggs and rice starch in the Advanced Breads Section.

Ashley Ogle
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Patricia Severson
4 Posts
Patricia
Grand Junction CO
USA

Posted - Jan 18 2020 :  2:58:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I just spent the day baking the French loaf. I have several issues. First, the bread dough did not rise much. This is the first week of using the refrigerated mother. There were plenty of bubbles in the starter, so I know it is mature enough. Following the recipe, I lined the pan with parchment paper. Now, with the loaf baked, the paper is stuck to the loaf. HELP! I am feeling discouraged. All the breads I have baked have been dense and pretty flat. Flavor is okay. Any suggestions?
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Ashley
452 Posts
Ashley
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Jan 20 2020 :  1:14:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Pat, Can you tell me a little more about the consistency of your bread dough?

If it's sticking to the parchment paper, I want to say that your dough is too wet, which also might explain the lack of rise. I wonder if adding a bit more flour would do the trick? This is a delicate balance because you don't want to get too much flour in your loaves, because they will come out dry (especially when using rice flours). To keep the loaves from sticking to the parchment, sprinkling a little flour on the outside of the loaves, and on the parchment should help.

Ashley Ogle
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Patricia Severson
4 Posts
Patricia
Grand Junction CO
USA

Posted - Jan 23 2020 :  11:37:08 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you. I will try adding more flour this week. The dough is pretty wet, although when I first added the flour it was so dry that not all the flour was absorbed. Through the conditioning it did get better, but when I put it in the pan, it was wet. This week I am going to make the sandwich bread. I will let you know how it goes.
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Ashley
452 Posts
Ashley
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Jan 23 2020 :  1:20:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I hope this week will be a better Bake Day than your last.

The rice flour dough does start out pretty dry, and as it conditions, relaxes. I think this is just a characteristic of rice flour. I don't know if you've ever seen recipes that call for allowing gluten-free muffin or quick-bread batter to "rest" in the pan before baking, but it's kind of the same idea—that if you wait a bit, the rice flour will relax, and let go of some of the moisture, which will create a more moist muffin or bread. This is great for recipes that are baked in any kind of pan, but shaping rice breads takes more finesse, because you're always toeing the line between too dry or wet and shapeless.

Ashley Ogle
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