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 Beginner Breads
 7. English Muffins
 Help! Einkorn Flour
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Glenda
10 Posts
Glenda
Waterville MN

Posted - Mar 23 2019 :  10:20:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Today is bake day of week 5. I am using freshly milled einkorn berries from my Mockmill. My mother seems strong and let weekís batter bread rose level with the bread pans when baking.

Today I decided to try English muffins. I currently have a glop of dough on my counter. It doesnít want to cut well, and Iím afraid to add more flour (have already added in 6 cups to the 5.5 cups of original starter) and make it tough. Is this just the way it is? And if so, how do I keep them formed to put in the pan?

Iím frustrated because I donít know what to do. So I left it, ate some lunch, and now am hoping someone on here can help. Iíll try to add a picture.

Thanks!
Glenda in sunny and warm MN

Glenda
10 Posts
Glenda
Waterville MN

Posted - Mar 23 2019 :  10:23:30 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
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Glenda
10 Posts
Glenda
Waterville MN

Posted - Mar 23 2019 :  10:25:27 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
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Ashley
378 Posts
Ashley
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Mar 23 2019 :  12:40:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Glenda, I hope Iím not too late...Leaving your dough for a little while could be beneficial as it will give the flour more time to absorb liquid. It sounds like even after a rest it was formless. Adding a little more flour should help. I wouldnít worry about it making your muffins dry as long as you add just enough to make the dough workable. Iíd start by working in an extra 1/2 cup, and then dusting your work surface generously to keep the dough from sticking to the counter and your hands. This should make it so youíre able to get the muffins onto the baking sheets.

Ashley Ogle
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Ashley
378 Posts
Ashley
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Mar 23 2019 :  12:45:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Also, I would transfer each muffin to the pan as soon as you cut each one to prevent the dough from melding together as it sits.

Ashley Ogle
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Glenda
10 Posts
Glenda
Waterville MN

Posted - Mar 25 2019 :  11:57:00 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Ashley,

I'm sorry I haven't responded, but life and responsibilities prevented that till now. Your response was too late for that batch, but I'm storing away the knowledge for the next day. This is what I ended up doing.

I let the dough that I sent pictures of to sit like that on my island for about thirty minutes. Then I used a dough scraper and folded it all onto itself. My guess is that about 1/4 - 1/2 cup of flour from the counter was therefore folded in as well. I then used damp hands to flatten it out, a damp cutter to cut, and a damp spatula to move them onto the pan. I then let them raise for about 30 minutes, fried them on my iron griddle, and baked them for about 25 minutes. Some raised rather well on the griddle while others stayed flat. None raised anymore while baking in the oven. The taste is fine, but not "airy" looking like the pictures of the ones in the Wild Bread book.

I did take pictures of the other stages and can send them if any care to see.

Still a novice,
Glenda
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Ashley
378 Posts
Ashley
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Mar 25 2019 :  4:55:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Iím glad you were able to make English muffins out of the dough you had. Itís unfortunate that they werenít light and airy. When you made Batter Breads, did you have a similar issue with the dough being too wet?

Ashley Ogle
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MaryJane
136 Posts
MaryJane
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Mar 25 2019 :  5:03:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
And since you're grinding your own wheat, how fine are you grinding it?

MaryJane Butters, author of Wild Bread ~ for we were all one family then ~
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Glenda
10 Posts
Glenda
Waterville MN

Posted - Mar 26 2019 :  08:32:25 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ashley,

I looked over my notes I've kept since day 1 of starting my counter mother and there are none mentioning the Batter Bread dough being too wet. I do recall that it was much more like quick bread batter than bread dough. Also I would say that the inside of the bread (two weeks I did batter bowl, the following week I used the loaf pan) was moist. My notes say I baked between 25 - 30 minutes each time, checking the internal temperature and removing at 200 degrees or above.

MaryJane,
I have the Mockmill set on 1, which is the lowest/finest setting. Although, I *think* I can re-set it in order to make it finer.

Glenda
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Ashley
378 Posts
Ashley
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Mar 27 2019 :  09:46:04 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The flour does look a little coarse in your picture, which could help explain why the dough for your English muffins was too wet. If this is the case, I'm not sure why you didn't have the same issue with your Batter breads--perhaps they're more forgiving because they're baked in a pan and the dough doesn't require handling like English muffins do?

Ashley Ogle
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Sylvia Jacobus
55 Posts
Sylvia
Kent WA
USA

Posted - Mar 31 2019 :  2:44:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Mock Mill can be adjusted to grind a very fine flour. It's a procedure the company will help you with if you don;t understand the book that was included. :)

Bread is like the sun. It rises in the yeast and sets in the waist. Unknown author
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