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 Beginner Breads
 2. Creating a Wild-Yeast Starter (Mother)
 Gluten Free Mother
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Gabby
5 Posts
Gabby
Thornhill Ontario
Canada

Posted - Jan 14 2019 :  05:46:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi everyone,
I have long wanted to make my own gluten free sourdough bread. Since I had no experience in making bread before, I was very happy to find this book that explained all the steps so clearly. I decided to start with kamut flour, just to make sure the technique is good and that it works for me.
It was amazing!!!! The bread was delicious and I even got to make bagels that looked great and tasted amazing!

When I saw the technique works well, I tried it on buckwheat flour, my favorite gluten free flour. The first few days were great, my mother was frothy and nice, but after a few days it went flat and became a flour and water paste. I grew it for over a month, enjoying waffles every week, but it never grew properly. I then tried to change the brand of the flour but results were the same.
I decided to try quinoa flour, since the book has specific recipes for it. The result was the same as with my buckwheat flour - frothy for the first few days, totally plat and pasty after day 5.
Any suggestions as to why this is happening and what can be done to overcome it?

...and remember,
Cook your food -
Love your life.
Your friend,
Gabby

Edited by - Gabby on Jan 14 2019 05:48:08 AM

Ashley
425 Posts
Ashley
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Jan 14 2019 :  08:10:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It sounds like you kept your buckwheat mothers longer than your quinoa mother, but had the same issue with both, so I'll ask about the buckwheat mother. When you were keeping your buckwheat mother, what did it smell like? And did it impart any kind of sour flavor in the waffles you made with it? Did you attempt any waffles with your quinoa mother? if so, did you notice any sour flavor?

It seems strange that both your buckwheat and quinoa mothers had activity and then just went flat, especially after you had such great success with your Kamut mother. I've not made a mother with buckwheat flour, so I can't draw from any experience there, but quinoa has always been quick to ferment for me. Can you think of anything that may have changed between the timeframe you were keeping your Kamut mother and starting your gluten-free mothers?

Ashley Ogle
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Gabby
5 Posts
Gabby
Thornhill Ontario
Canada

Posted - Jan 14 2019 :  09:48:46 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Ashley,
Thanks for your reply!
My buckwheat, kamut, and quinoa mothers were all kept at the same location on my kitchen counter. I use distilled water for all of them.
My buckwheat mother smelled sour, and the waffeles had a nice sour flavour to them, present lightly but not overwhelming. My quinoa mother is acidic (I tasted it just now).
The only thing that I can think of that had changed between my kamut mothers and the gluten free ones is the temperature outside. I grew my kamut mother in the fall and early winter, but now it is the middle of winter with much lower temperatures outside. My home ,however, is always heated at the same temperature of 23-23 celcius (72-73 F).
Any thoughts you have on this issue?
Thanks,
Gabby

...and remember,
Cook your food -
Love your life.
Your friend,
Gabby
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Gabby
5 Posts
Gabby
Thornhill Ontario
Canada

Posted - Jan 15 2019 :  07:39:27 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Ashley,
This morning my quinoa mother looks much better. It is frothy with some bubbles. I'll keep you updated, hopefully things will work out!
Thanks,
Gabby

...and remember,
Cook your food -
Love your life.
Your friend,
Gabby
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Ashley
425 Posts
Ashley
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Jan 15 2019 :  08:19:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The acidic taste of your quinoa mother is telling that lactic acid is driving the fermentation right now. This is a tricky one because you need it in there, but too much and it hogs the food supply. Over growth of lactic acid can be caused by the temperature of your mother being too cold--it can thrive at lower temperatures than wild yeast. I was wondering if the time of year you started each mother might be part of it, but if the temperature inside your house stays consistent, this shouldn't matter. Also, sometimes it just grows faster that wild yeast, and as your mother matures, it balances out with the wild yeast. It's very promising that your quinoa mother is frothy and bubbly. How long have you been keeping your quinoa mother?

Ashley Ogle
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Gabby
5 Posts
Gabby
Thornhill Ontario
Canada

Posted - Jan 15 2019 :  2:07:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Ashley,
I started my quinoa mother last week. Today was supposed to be bake day, but it's for sure not ready for bread. I kept 1/2 cup growing on the counter, and placed the rest in fridge, I'll probably make waffles out of it.
I'll keep you updated,
Thanks!

...and remember,
Cook your food -
Love your life.
Your friend,
Gabby
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Ashley
425 Posts
Ashley
MOSCOW Idaho
USA

Posted - Jan 15 2019 :  3:13:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Gabby, It's even better news that your mother is just a week old. I'm holding out hope that it continues bubbling and frothing like you saw this morning. Keep me posted!

Ashley Ogle
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